Black Plants for a Gothic Garden

Black Flowers Add Mystery to Any Garden

With gothic clothing and culture becoming more and more trendy, avid gardeners are looking for ways to extend the culture into their gardens by breeding extremely dark hued plants and flowers, some that are truely black. These plants can be used for a gothic themed garden when combined with gothic decor and accessories.

However, many florists and wedding planners are using these dark flowers more and more in combination with light flowers for a vivid contrast. This page is just a brief introduction into the idea of gothic gardening. For more information on each flower or plant, click through the links.

Disporum, Night Heron

The plant featured in the image above is Disporum, Night Heron.

Disporum, Night Heron originally comes from China and can be grown in containers or in the ground.

Black Plants: 75 Striking Choices for the Garden

Whether you are looking for plants to go into a gothic garden or just some contrast for your summer planting, this book is a wonderful guide to all the dark and lovely flowers and plants available to use.

Black Plants: 75 Striking Choices for the Garden

Author Paul Bonine profiles 75 of the most alluring black annuals, perennials, bulbs, and shrubs. Some of the plants—like agapanthus and lilies—are darker versions of familiar favorites, while others are rarities that will appeal to the most discerning collector. Each entry describes the plant’s essential features and details the requirements for growth and care.

Are You a Gothic Gardener?

Let me make your garden grow. . .

Featured: Black Star Calla Lily icon

With the new technology available to plant breeders, it is much easier to create new breeds of old favorite flowers and plants. This is evident by the newly available breeds of annuals and perennials that can be purchased in seed or blub form.

Gothic gardens and black flowers are becoming increasingly popular with florists and avid gardeners. It is fun to create a garden that has a gothic theme by mixing the different shades of blackness from deep purple to deep maroon to black with gothic accessories. It is also useful to create borders around brighter patches of flowers with black flowers.

Each year, more varieties are sold but they are still difficult to find in local stores and garden centers.

Many of these flowers are darker versions of more common varieties, while some are new to the United States altogether. Is a gothic garden something that you would enjoy? If so, read on.

Black of Night Rose

What is more gothic than a beautiful black rose? This bush can grow in your garden for many hours of gothic delight.

Black of Night Rose Seeds

Planting Black Flowers

Featured: Black Sprite, Centaurea icon

Just like any garden, each individual flower type has specific needs. Be sure to read the information on how much sun, shade, and water to use, and what part of the country is best to grow each plant. Most of the dark varieties behave like their lighter colored cousins, but not all, so it is best read up on that specific variety for your climate.

If you are looking to plan a year long or season long garden, mixing annuals with perennials is a good idea, as well as earlier blooming flowers, with later blooming flowers. Some varieties can also be started indoors before the weather is warm enough to plant outdoors.

For in-depth planting information on specific flowers, visit Black Flowers.

Flower Scabiosa Black Knight

These almost black, dark maroon flowers stand between 2 and 3 feet high. Gorgeous additions to a gothic bouquet or just enjoy them in your garden.

Flower Scabiosa Black Knight

Add These Black Flowers to Your Garden

Find out more about these Black Flowers.

Sophistica Blackberry Petunia Flower

Another almost black flower with velvety petals, this flower has a lovely fragrance and will grow in most climates.

Sophistica Blackberry Petunia 10 Pellitized Seeds

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1 Comment

  1. Gypzeerose

    These black plants for a Gothic garden are very special, and many could be planted for Halloween around my area.

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Meet The Author

Paula Atwell

I am an artist, freelance writer and the owner of Lake Erie Artists Gallery.

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